Religion

Why Study Religion at Ozarks?

Some students study religion in order to work out and deepen their own faith commitments. Others approach it as a journey to a far country, wondering about what makes us human despite our vast differences in belief and practice. Still others may simply be curious about religion as one of the most powerful forces in human existence. Whatever the case, Ozarks gives you the chance to explore the great, enduring questions of faith.

Students who study religion typically enjoy a good, lively dialogue about the hot-button issues of our day. But they don’t just sit in classrooms. Students in world religions courses may visit a Shabbat service at a Reform synagogue, or observe Friday prayers at a nearby mosque. In recent years, they’ve joined with faculty for travel courses to see the pyramids of Egypt, the Ganges River in India, and the Holocaust site at Auschwitz. Students also do amazing things that put their commitments into practice, whether it’s something close at hand like leading in Ozarks Chapel, or farther away, like relief work for Syrian refugees in Greece. The possibilities are truly endless!

 

“To know God is unlike any other knowledge; indeed, it is more truly to be known, and so transformed.” Sarah Coakley

WHAT OUR STUDENTS DO

President Dunsworth named to APCU board

University of the Ozarks President Richard Dunsworth, J.D., has been elected to the board of directors for the Association of Presbyterian Colleges and Universities (APCU).

University awards 87 degrees to Class of 2017

University of the Ozarks awarded 87 bachelor’s degrees to graduating seniors during its 183rd Commencement ceremony, held May 13, on the campus mall.

Rotaract mission trip embodies University values

One of the core values of University of the Ozarks is “the service of all of creation,” and that driving principle was on full display during a recent mission trip to El Salvador by the student organization Rotaract.

“If I went back to college today, I think I would probably major in comparative religion, because that’show integrated it is in everything that we are working on and deciding and thinking about in life today.”

John Kerry, former Secretary of State