University Theatre To Present “Sylvia” April 26-28

University Theatre To Present “Sylvia” April 26-28

University of the Ozarks Theatre will wrap up its 2018-19 season with a three-show performance of A.R. Gurney’s modern comedy Sylvia on April 26, 27 and 28. The production, which contains mature language and content, will begin at 7:30 p.m. on April 26 and 27 and at 2 p.m. on April 28 and will be held in the Seay Theatre in the University’s Walton Fine Arts Center. The public is invited to attend and tickets are $8 each. Sylvia revolves around Greg and Kate, who have moved to Manhattan after 22 years of child-raising in the suburbs. Greg’s career as a financial trader is winding down, while Kate’s career, as a public-school English teacher, is beginning to offer her more opportunities. Greg brings home a dog he found in the park—or that has found him—bearing only the name “Sylvia” on her name tag. A street-smart mixture of Lab and Poodle, Sylvia becomes a major bone of contention between husband and wife. She offers Greg an escape from the frustrations of his job and the unknowns of middle age. To Kate, Sylvia becomes a rival for affection. And Sylvia thinks Kate just doesn’t understand the relationship between man and dog. The marriage is put in serious jeopardy until, after a series of hilarious and touching complications, Greg and Kate learn to compromise, and Sylvia becomes a valued part of their lives Rebecca Bailey, assistant professor of theatre, is the director of the play. The cast includes, Tiffany Quinton as Sylvia, Rhett Sells as Greg, Haley Hanks as Kate and Haley Wheeler as Tom, Phyllis and Leslie. The crew includes, Lucas Hoiland as lighting designer, Jimmy Reiner as stage manager, Petron Brown as assistant stage manager, Billy Wilburn as costume designer, Quinton as assistant costume designer, Mason Clough as set designer, Hannah Bradow as sound designer, Wheeler as graphic designer, Nichole Finch as props master, Daniel Hall as technical director, Sydney Ward as light board operator and Kenzie Lewis as sound board operator. Other crew members are, Fion Chen, Taylor McFarland, Kevin Nawa, Lacye Day, Ethan Lubera, Haley Grace Clark and the stage craft class. The New York Times said, “Dramatic literature is stuffed with memorable love scenes, but none is as immediately delicious and dizzy as the one that begins the redeeming affair in A.R. Gurney's new comedy, Sylvia…” The New York Daily News said, “I can only call it one of the most involving, beautiful, funny, touching and profound plays I have ever seen…” Backstage said, “Gurney's mad comedy is the most endearing good time to trot down the pike in many a moon. Howlingly funny…” University of the Ozarks Theatre will present three showings of Neil Simon’s iconic play, “Barefoot in the Park,” on March 8, 9 and 10. The romantic comedy will be shown at 7:30 p.m. on March 8 and 9 and at 2 p.m. on March 10, in the Black Box Theatre in the Walton Fine Arts Center. Tickets are $8 each and can be purchased online at Ozarks.edu/theatre or at the box office one hour prior to the showtime. Premiering in 1963 on Broadway, “Barefoot in the Park” tells the story of a newlywed couple, Corie and Paul Bratter. For their first home, they live in an apartment on the top floor of a brownstone in New York City. Corie is optimistic about their future together, while Paul, the more anxious and grounded half of the couple, worries about the various flaws in the apartment, such as a hole in the skylight, their leaky closet, and the lack of a bathtub. Shortly after moving in, Corrie attempts to set her mother up with their eccentric neighbor Mr. Velasco. During the course of four days, the couple learns to live together while facing the usual daily ups-and-downs. Corrie wants Paul to become more easy-going: for example, to run "barefoot in the park.” The play was nominated for three 1964 Tony Awards and was turned into a film in 1967 starring Robert Redford and jane Fonda. In the U of O production, Rebecca Bailey, assistant professor of theatre, will direct the play and Lucas Hoiland, assistant professor of practice of theatre, will serve as the technical director. The all-student cast includes, Haley Grace Clark as Corie, Petron Brown as Paul, Haley Hanks as the mother, Mason Clough as Victor Velasco, Rhett Sells as the telephone repair man, McKenzie Lewis as delivery woman number one, Haley Wheeler as delivery woman number two, Jimmy Reinier as delivery man number one and Kevin Nawa as delivery man number two. The crew includes, Ben Howard as stage manager, Sydney Ward as assistant stage manager and props master, Ethan Lubera as scenic designer, Eleazar Coronado as lighting designer, Lacye Day as costume designer, Sells as sound designer, Masey Wilson as graphic designer and Daniel Hall as window wizard. The sound board operator is Nichole Finch and the light board operator is Geoshan Lee. Other crew members include, Tiffany Quinton, Toria Matthews, Fion Chen, Poly Ojeda and Lily Olmsted. The first time Lacye Day performed on the theatrical stage was during a high school production of “Hamlet.” When the opening curtain went up she began to doubt her decision to be in the play. “When I first saw the audience on opening night, I remember having this strong feeling of regret,” she said. “I was terrified that I would accidentally drop a line or forget the blocking.” All that quickly changed. “Once I stepped on the stage and let go, I realized how much I loved it and how comfortable it felt. Since then, theatre has been my passion.” Day is a University of the Ozarks junior theatre and psychology major from Oologah, Okla. In November she was awarded a prestigious Irene Ryan Acting Scholarship nomination for her powerful portrayal of Anne Frank in the University Theatre’s fall production of “The Diary of Anne Frank.” Day first learned that incoming Theatre Professor Rebecca Bailey was planning a production of the Anne Frank play while Day was working a summer internship as a paints apprentice for the Hangar Theatre in Ithaca, N.Y. “I had little knowledge of the original play and the revisions, so when I returned home I found ‘The Diary of a Young Girl’ online and began reading a few passages from Anne’s diary,” Day said. “At this point I didn’t have a strong connection to the show or story, but I was definitely excited to delve into such a powerful show.” It was during the auditions for the role that Day first began to understand the main character’s spirituous persona. “I was reading one of Anne’s many uplifting monologues and after working through it a few times with the director I began to feel the spirit and light that Anne is so well known for,” Day said. “Professor Bailey gave me a note at the end of the audition that still sits with me: ‘Never lose the smile. Anne has an everlasting smile.’” Lacye DayDay said playing the role of Frank was far and away the most challenging of her young career. “Anne is known for her spirit and endurance in the face of darkness, but it baffled me why or how she could possibly feel such joy in a miserable place,” Day said. “Preparing for Anne was a challenge all its own. Our dramaturg did extensive research in the historical aspects of the play as well as the Jewish traditions and early lives of each member of the annex. We each did individual research and presentations over our characters. We were also required to learn four songs — one in German and three in Hebrew — which involved a great amount of practice and collaboration. Though these preparations were extensive, they were essential to the accurate portrayal of the families.” In order to better understand the Jewish faith, the theatre company also attended a Shabbat service at Temple B’Nai Israel in Little Rock. “We toured the temple and were taught the various holidays, traditions and beliefs involved in Judaism,” she said. “This experience was helpful in understanding Anne’s unrelenting faith and desire to make others happy.” With special performances for area schools, the cast and crew performed a total of five shows of the two-hour production over consecutive days, which left Day and her colleagues physically and mentally exhausted. “The end scene was especially difficult to perform each night and involved a lot of hugging and crying backstage,” Day said. “On days when I felt drained, I reminded myself of the importance of Anne’s story and let her spirit motivate me to show the audience the incredible life she had.” Day was particularly touched by the feedback she received from classmates and other audience members. “We received many positive reviews from classmates and faculty members who were moved by the story and the effort involved,” she said. “Performing for the two schools was a growing experience for me as an actress. Both schools reacted differently when compared to the previous audiences and were more reactive to the events of the play. Many of the students who attended the play were the same age as Anne when she went into hiding, a factor that allowed me to focus on telling her story to the students. It is my hope that these students remember Anne’s story when faced with adversity or inequality and let that motivate them to act against it.” Day said the role of Anne “has only intensified my desire to act and inspire others through theatre.” “Though the performances are over, the meaning of the story and the experiences remains with me. The role gave me a different outlook when coping with adversity. Anne’s story has impacted my life by giving me a different outlook on adversity and by making me more grateful for my life and loved ones.” The play received accolades from a respondent with the American College Theatre Festival, who presented the company awards in scene design, sound design, dramaturgy, ensemble acting and two Irene Ryan nominations. “It is wonderful to be rewarded for our efforts in this show,” she said. “However, it is even more wonderful to know that Anne’s memory, and the memories of the six million, have not been forgotten.” One of the production highlights for Day was an opportunity for the current company to meet several of the cast and crew from the 1988 U of O production of “The Diary of Anne Frank,” who had come back to campus for a mini-reunion and to watch the current version of the play. “It was exciting to meet the alumni of the original Anne Frank cast and crew,” she said. “Our theatre department continues to put on excellent productions, but we know that we wouldn’t have the work space or tools without Lacye Daythe previous members of the theatre department. We listened to alumni reminisce about how bare and empty the work shop used to be compared to now. Seeing so many theatre lovers of different ages appreciating the art of theatre together was delightful.” Day, who wants to pursue a career in either theatre or art therapy, said the University Theatre program has helped her grow her skills and talents in ways she never would have imagined. “Prior to U of O, I attended a small high school with a limited theatre department,” Day said. “We were unable to build sets or design certain elements of a performance, so I didn’t have a lot of experience coming in. Since then I have gained both performance and technical skills that were essential to gaining an internship. I also gained experience working with various people from different backgrounds and learning how to communicate effectively with department heads.  The most rewarding part of being a theatre major is acquiring an essential set of skills such as time management, stress management, and developing a work ethic.” Though it has been nearly three decades since Anthony L. Mariani stood on the stage of the University of the Ozarks’ Seay Theatre, he felt right at home. Mariani, a 1990 Ozarks theatre graduate who has gone on to an accomplished career as a playwright, screenwriter and film and stage director, returned to campus on Feb. 7 to put on a workshop for communication and theatre students on the Seay stage. It was Mariani’s first time on that stage since he served as the student director of the University Theatre’s production of “The Adding Machine” during his senior year in 1990. “It was a little surreal to come back here. It brought back some great memories,” Mariani said. “Dr. Pat Farmer let me direct that play and that was the main reason I got into graduate school and it kind of propelled my career, so this place is special to me. Everything looks just as I remembered it. It feels like home.” Mariani, who lives in Little Rock, was invited back to Ozarks by Susan Edens, associate professor of practice of communication and a former classmate of his at U of O. Mariani spent nearly two hours working with approximately 25 students from the media II and theatre production classes providing technical tips on everything from camera angles to set props. He also shared anecdotes of working on film sets as well as advice on how to break into the industry. “I think it’s very important for alumni to come back and help out current students any way we can,” Mariani said. “If you get a chance to help someone else move forward, you should do it. When I left here I was the first one to go out to Hollywood, so I think it’s important for students to see that you can make it from anywhere. I was fortunate enough to make some connections and networks that have helped other Ozarks students. I also enjoy the teaching aspect. I used to teach high school and I really enjoy sharing knowledge.” After earning an MFA in directing from the California Institute of the Arts, Mariani spent the 1990s working in Hollywood, first as a production assistant on “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno,” and then as an assistant director on numerous independent films, commercials and television shows. MarianiHe returned to Little Rock in the 2000s, where he has found success as a playwright and screenwriter. One of his most recent plays, “I Got You, Babe,” was published in Lawrence Harbison's anthology, “The Best Ten-Minute Plays of 2018,” and was the 2018 10x10 Infinity Best Short Play winner. He has also won numerous awards and recognition for many of his other recent works, including the play, “The Rooster Rebellion,” and the short film, “Don’t You Forget About Me.” “As a playwright, I have tried to tackle social and political topics that face society today,” Mariani said. “I try to tell meaningful stories that an audience can reflect on long after they leave the theatre. I strive to write for change, to affect my audience and to inspire us all to be better humans on this earth.” The Ozarks students enjoyed hearing from an alumnus who could share stories about working with and meeting some of Hollywood’s top names, including director Steven Spielberg and actor Robert De Niro. “To be able to hear from someone who has that type of experience and history in the industry is very inspiring,” said communication student Ariel McKinney. “Knowing that he came from a small school like Ozarks and had success shows us that we can do the same thing and that we should follow our career dreams.” The timing was especially good for Mariani’s visit since many of the students are beginning to work on a multi-class film project. The students are turning a play called “Somoas,” written by U of O Associate Professor of Communication Dr. Rhonda Shook, into a screenplay. “He gave some great tips and advice that will definitely help us in making the film,” said sophomore communication major Bradley Thompson. “To be able to get that kind of information from someone with his experience is a wonderful thing.” Mariani hopes he can also be an inspiration for students in the Jones Learning Center. Mariani said he was diagnosed with dyslexia and dysgraphia after high school and that led to him transferring to Ozarks for the learning center. “Think about how it’s like to have dyslexia and dysgraphia and have a play published,” he said. “That to me is pretty amazing and I think it can inspire and motivate learning center students that they can do anything they set their minds to.” Mariani said he has found that his dyslexia actually helps him be a better director. “I had to be such a good listener in class to pick up as much as I could and that has helped me,” he said. “As a director you’ve got to listen to your actors and your performers, pick up on little cues and always be open to advice and input from others. You can’t be rigid in this industry and the training and experience I received in listening has helped tremendously.” Mariani said he has numerous projects in the works, including a play called, “The Morning Chair,” which is having a reading in Austin, Texas, this spring. He is also writing a comedy play called “Annie Luna,” and working on a project that deals with the aftermath of the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. University of the Ozarks Theatre will open its 2018-19 season with several performances of the powerful adaptation of “The Diary of Anne Frank,” scheduled for Nov. 2-6 in the Walton Fine Arts Center. The production will be open to the public for three performances, Nov. 2, 3 and 4. It will begin at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 2, and Saturday, Nov. 3, and at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 4. There will also be two special matinee showings for local school children on Nov. 5 and 6. Tickets are $8 for adults and $5 for seniors and students and can be purchased at Ozarks.edu/theatre or at the box office on the evening of the production. “The Diary of Anne Frank” is a 1997 adaptation by Wendy Kesselman of the original stage play written by Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett. It is based on the book, “Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl.” In the new adaptation, Frank emerges from history a living, lyrical, intensely gifted young girl, who confronts her rapidly changing life and the increasing horror of her time with astonishing honesty, wit, and determination. An impassioned drama about the lives of eight people hiding from the Nazis in a concealed storage attic, “The Diary of Anne Frank” captures the claustrophobic realities of their daily existence — their fear, their hope, their laughter, their grief. Each day of these two dark years, Frank’s voice shines through: “When I write I shake off all my cares. But I want to achieve more than that. I want to be useful and bring enjoyment to all people, even those I've never met. I want to go on living even after my death!” This is a powerful new adaptation for a new generation. The New York Times called the play, “Undeniably moving. It shatters the heart. The evening never lets us forget the inhuman darkness waiting to claim its incandescently human heroine.”  The New York Post said it was “an extraordinary theatrical adventure! Go and remember." The Associated Press called it “a powerful new version that moves the audience to gasp, then tears.” The all-student cast includes, Lacye Day as Anne Frank, Haley Grace Clark as Margot Frank, Mason Clough as Otto Frank, Haley Hanks as Edith Frank, Hannah Bradow as Meip Geis, Petron Brown as Peter Van Daan, Tiffany Quinton as Mrs. Van Daan, Rhett Sells as Mr. Van Daan, Kevin Nawa as Mr. Dussell, Ben Howard as Mr. Kraler, Jimmy Reinier as first man, Eleazar Coronado as second man and Sydney Ward as third man. The director is Rebecca Bailey, assistant professor of theatre. Lucas Hoiland, assistant professor of practice of theatre, will serve as the technical director and set and lighting designer. The student crew includes, Jenava Harris as costume designer, Ethan Lubera as prop designer and stage manager, McKenzie Lewis as assistant stage manager, Nichole Finch as sound board operator, Geoshan Lee as light board operator and Haley Hanks overseeing the dramaturg, lobby and curriculum. Other crew members include, Haley Wheeler, Fion Xin Yi Chen and Lily Olmstead. The production will include a special arrangement sound design by Dan Moses Schreier and U of O student Daniel Hall. The production will mark the Ozarks directing debut of Bailey, who joined the faculty in July.  From the small town of Russell, Ky., Bailey’s journey has taken her from Virginia to South Dakota working in theatres and teaching.  She received her master of fine arts degree in directing from The University of South Dakota and her bachelor’s degree from South Dakota State University. Her professional research includes studies at The Globe and The American Shakespeare Center.  Directing credits include Prairie Repertory Theatre, South Dakota Shakespeare Festival, and The University of South Dakota. Five University of the Ozarks theatre majors gained meaningful experience and skills this summer through internships at various thespian venues around the country. Daniel Hall of Sherwood, Ark.; Mason Clough of Arlington, Texas; Ben Howard of Searcy, Ark.; Lacye Day of Oologah, Okla.; and Ethan Lubera of Siloam Springs, Ark., all took part in professional theatre internships over the summer. Each of the students gave a presentation about their summer experiences to other theatre majors and their professors during a class period last week. Rebecca Bailey, assistant professor of theatre, said summer internships are a major part of the learning experience and that it is beneficial for other students to hear first-hand about what their classmates have done. “Professional internships in theatre allow our students to sharpen the skills they have developed at Ozarks, introduce them to new ideas and methods, and most importantly connect them with their future colleagues,” Bailey said. “When these young professionals step into their positions, they find moments when the work they have been generating at school is both reinforced and challenged. By sharing their successes and struggles with their fellow classmates, we both learn as a department and inspire our underclass to seek out new opportunities.” Hall, a senior, spent his summer working at the McLeod Summer Playhouse in Carbondale, Ill., where he worked on sets for performances such as “Jungle Book,” “9 to 5” and “Mamma Mia” and honed his welding skills. Clough, a junior, worked in lighting design for the Brevard Music Center in Brevard, N.C. Howard, a junior, served a 12-week internship with the Berkshire Theatre Group in Stockbridge, Mass. He worked as a general technician, rotating between various departments. Day, a junior theatre and psychology major, served as a paints apprentice for the Hangar Theatre in Ithaca, N.Y., where she worked on several sets, including a production of “Xanadu.” Lubera, a junior, worked as a camp counselor and technical theatre activity head for the Kingsley Pines Camp in Raymond, Maine, Lubera worked with youth ages 8 to 16 and led the scene crew for the camp’s productions. Rebecca Bailey will join the University of the Ozarks’ faculty as an assistant professor of theatre, beginning in the Fall 2018 Semester. Bailey has served as an adjunct instructor at the University of South Dakota (USD) since 2016. She also has extensive acting and directing experience on both the university and community theatre levels. A native of Kentucky, Bailey said she found a love for the theatre at an early age, performing in theatre productions throughout the Midwest. As she got older she discovered that she also enjoyed the behind-the-scenes aspect of the discipline as well. “As I pursued my education, I developed a passion for directing and teaching,” Bailey said. “While I delight in building a character and the relationship with the audience, I have found that focusing on the journey of the whole production and building the ensemble are at the heart of my theatrical world.  I am energized by the magic when I step into the rehearsal room or the theatre classroom.” Bailey spent a year studying Shakespeare and Performance at Mary Baldwin with the American Shakespeare Center.  Her performance work includes a focus on period styles, particularly Shakespeare, and movement. “My work with The American Shakespeare Center and actors trained in Viewpoints with Anne Bogart’s SITI Company have given me a unique knowledge to share in performance,” Bailey said. “I have combined my study of movement work with classical texts, particularly Shakespeare, but including a variety of periods and styles from Greek to Brecht. I have found that by helping young actors physically embody Shakespeare, and contemporary works, they develop a closer relationship to the text.” As a director, she has worked with a variety of styles, from musicals like “Disney’s The Little Mermaid” and “Into the Woods,” to more intimate productions like “Venus in Fur” and classics like “Comedy of Errors.” She is excited about sharing her knowledge and experiences with Ozarks’ theatre students. “I am passionate about a program that offers undergraduates the maximum number of opportunities to prepare them for graduate school, the professional world, and to become emerging artists,” she said. “My performance work focuses on a variety of techniques in directing and acting, including classical texts, musicals, movement, and devised works. I feel these contributions will serve students at University of the Ozarks well. Bailey completed an MFA in directing at University of South Dakota in 2016. She earned her undergraduate degree in theatre from South Dakota State University. University of the Ozarks Theatre will cap its 2017-18 season with a production of the classic French comedy “Boeing Boeing” by Marc Camoletti on April 26, 27 and 28. Show times are 7:30 p.m. on April 26 and 27 and 3 p.m. on April 28 in the Walton Fine Art Center’s Seay Theatre. Tickets are $8 each and can be purchased online or at the box officer prior to the performance. “Boeing Boeing” is a 1960s French farce adapted for the English-speaking stage that features self-styled Parisian lothario Bernard, who has Italian, German, and American fiancées, each a beautiful airline hostess with frequent “layovers.” He keeps “one up, one down, and one pending” until unexpected schedule changes bring all three to Paris, and Bernard’s apartment, at the same time. The New York Times review stated, “This latest edition of a play named for an aircraft soars right out of its time zone and into some unpolluted stratosphere of classic physical comedy. Propelled by the same gusty spirit that animated Commedia dell’Arte and the silent films of Keaton, Chaplin and Lloyd, [this] may be earthy, but it’s seldom earthbound.”

Cast and Crew

The University’s production cast includes, Haley Hanks as Gretchen, Lacye Day as Gabriella, Haley Grace Clark as Gloria, Tiffany Quinton as Berthe, Mason Clough as Robert and Rhett Sells as Bernard. The production team includes, Walton Professor of Theatre Bruce B. Brown as the director as well as scenic and sound designer; Assistant Professor of Practice of Theatre Lucan Hoiland as lighting designer and technical director; James Allen as stage manager and scenic artist; Ethan Lubera as costume designer and Day as graphic designer. The remainder of the company includes, Daniel Hall as assistant technical director, Brown as house manager and Ben Howard as property master. The stage, curtain, electrics and wardrobe crew is comprised of Jamee Barham, Eleazar Coronado, Lubera, Kevin Nawa, Jimmy Reinier, Lilly Olmsted and Alexandra Sheinfeld. University of the Ozarks Theatre will present three showings of John Cariani's romantic comedy "Almost, Maine" in the Black Box Theatre in the Walton Fine Arts Center. Show times are 7:30 p.m. on Feb. 22 and 23 and 3 p.m. on Feb. 24. Seating is limited. Tickets are $8 each and can be purchased online or at the box office prior to the performance. “Almost, Maine” is a play by Cariani that is comprised of nine shorter plays. Premiering in 2004 to critical acclaim, the play deals with themes of love and loss in a small Maine town named Almost. The play is a story of love and the way it hurts and heals the people of a small town so far north in the USA that it’s “almost” Canada. It features a multitude of characters, but a curious format. Each scene is a separate vignette and none of the characters appear again. The play has been produced by over 3,000 theater companies in the United States, making it one of the most frequently produced plays of the past decade. The New York Post said “Almost, Maine” “lands somewhere between Norman Rockwell and Our Town. Unabashedly unhip. There is no pretense of an edge here — the show offers a sweetness and decency that’s become rare at the theater. At this point, it’s a welcome breath of fresh air.”

Cast and Crew

The cast includes, Kevin Nawa as Pete, Steve and Man; Tiffany Quinton as Sandrine, Gayle and Hope; Ben Howard as East, Lendall, Randy and Phil; Haley Grace Clark as Marvalyn, Glory and Rhonda; Jimmy Reinier as Jimmy, Chad and David; and Lacye Day as Ginette, Waitress and Marci. The artistic staff includes Theatre Professor Bruce B. Brown as director; James Allen as scenic, costume and lighting designer; Daniel Hall as sound designer, sound board operator and master carpenter; and Lacye Day as graphic designer and scenic artist. The production staff includes, Brown as house manager; Professor Lucas Hoiland as technical director; Mason Clough as stage manager, master electrician and light board operator; and Eleazar Coronado as properties manager. The crew also includes Jamee Barham, Coronado, Lillian Olmsted and Haley Hanks. The University of the Ozarks Theatre captured 11 honors, including the prestigious Respondent's Choice award, at the 2017 Arkansas Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival, held Oct. 26-28 in Arkadelphia, Ark. The University Theatre presented its production of “Circle Mirror Transformation” by Annie Baker at the annual state festival. By winning the Respondent’s Choice award, one of the two top awards at the festival, the production is automatically nominated for the KCACTF Region VI festival in February. The University Theatre took home seven excellence honors in various categories at the state festival. Eleazar Coronado won Excellence in Stage Management; James Allen won Excellence in Costume Design and Honor Crew; and Daniel Hall won Excellence in Honor Crew. Bruce B. Brown, Walton professor of theatre, won Excellence in Scenic Design; and Lucas Hoiland, assistant professor of practice of theatre, won Excellence in Lighting Design. The cast also won an Excellence in Ensemble Performance. Ozarks theatre students Haley Grace Clark, Rhett Sells and Haley Hanks all won Irene Ryan Performance Awards for their performances in the play. In addition, Jimmy Reinier won both the student and faculty-judged Halloween costume contest. “I am so proud of this company and the outstanding work ethic and leadership they displayed during the process and at festival,” said Brown. “Our students’ dedication and passion for creating theatre is what leads to these wonderful achievements.” In December, six university theatre companies from Region VI (Arkansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Louisiana, and Texas) will be chosen to have a production featured at the 2018 regional festival in San Angelo, Texas, on Feb. 28.